Mittwoch, 26. November 2008

First trip: Bayrischer Wald

Iron Curtain installation as part of a future holiday resort in Finsterau, Germany


When you start a new project, it is probably a good idea to get help from a friend and encouragement from a colleague, who has worked on a similar idea. I found both in Passau (Germany), just a few kilometers south of the former Iron Curtain between Germany and the Czech Republic. My wife Brigitte and our Labrador dog Betula set off by car to meet Doris and Walter. They run the famous Scharfrichterhaus in the old town centre. It is a cultural centre, especially known for their extensive programming of political cabaret and an excellent restaurant. They put us up in style in the old tower of a fortress, overlooking the confluence of the Danube and Inn from the tiny windows. From here I made an appointment with cabaret artist, writer and photographer Rudi Klaffenböck. He is a precursor to my photo project, because he walked the Austrian borders of the former Iron Curtain some 15 years ago. He published the beautiful book "Grenz-gehen" about this hike (Verlag Karl Stutz 1998) and produced a performance using his text, projected pictures and selected objects from his trip. In his storage, he still has these objects. One is a rusted and very torn metal sheet in the vague shape of a man, whom Czech border guards used to shoot at. He found them full of bullet holes in an abandoned barrack and took them with him. I decided to take his portrait with him holding one of these figures. Having this objet trouve from my future travel destination and a fellow artist, who worked so successfully on the same topic seemed to me the perfect start and a good omen for the project.


The Passau based artist Rudolf Klaffenböck


Doris and Walter welcomed us so kindly and on the next day they took us to the former Iron Curtain, now the German - Czech border. We visited the now extinct but former village of Leopoldsreut. Only the school house and a little church are left. But this was the perfect start, because Walter was born in this village and lived here during his early childhood days. He showed us an open space in the dense forest, where you could still see some floor stones in the meadow which once was the doorsill of the inn owned by his family. Typically for the border region, this little village had been founded and supported to protect a regionally important trading route but then lost its importance with the change in our traffic patterns and totally collapsed being at the dead end of a route after the Iron Curtain was built. The village did not recover after the fall of the Iron Curtain and is now only a hikers' and bikers' destination.


Walter Landshuter in front of the former schoolhouse of Leopoldsreut, Germany

Kommentare:

Anonym hat gesagt…

Your blog keeps getting better and better! Your older articles are not as good as newer ones you have a lot more creativity and originality now keep it up!

Kurt Kaindl hat gesagt…

Thank you "Anonym" for the comments you left! They are the first comments I got since I started this blog in the beginning of 2009! This year marked the 20th anniversary of the fall of the iron curtain and I choose a title for my blog which I thought is really easy to find. And I added the address to my emails. That was all my "advertising" I did for the blog.

And I promised to myself, I will go on writing on my blog if I get just one comment from the huge internet society. Now - after one year - I got two comments - so, what shall I do now?

Kurt Kaindl, blog-author

Anonym hat gesagt…

Cool article you got here. I'd like to read a bit more about that theme. Thanx for giving this info.

Anonym hat gesagt…

Interesting blog you got here. I'd like to read more concerning this matter. Thnx for posting this info.

Anonym hat gesagt…

Genial fill someone in on and this post helped me alot in my college assignement. Thank you seeking your information.

Anonym hat gesagt…

Very Interesting!
Thank You!

Anonym hat gesagt…

Wow, rather nice article. How will I find that RSS?

Nicky Stone
detecting bugging devices